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Google Graveyard

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Google Health
Google Health

2008-2011

Google Health was launched in 2008 when Google joined with the Cleveland Clinic to allow patients to transfer their data into Google's electronic health information storage service. This wasn't a move without controversy, as critics were quick to point out that Google was not subject to HIPPA regulations. Google insisted that their existing privacy regulations were sufficient, but the average American couldn't think of why they'd need such a thing. It didn't help that there were only limited providers who would automatically transfer health info into the service.

Google added the ability to track and graph just about anything - weight, blood pressure, sleep, but it wasn't enough. The service was just not catching on, and Google decided to nix it in 2011. The service will formally end in 2012. Users will still have until 2013 to export their data to spreadsheets or other services, like Microsoft HealthVault. You could also just print it out if you decided to go back to old school or if you discovered an issue you wanted to discuss with your doctor.

For those that never used Google Health, having a place to track the health records of yourself and your family members is actually very useful. Tracking your own symptoms enables you to better inform your care provider and get a more accurate diagnosis. Weight and exercise trackers allow you to take charge of your own health without ads for diet products to get between you and your goals. There's also the philosophical argument that your health data should remain with you, and not in some hidden file in your doctor's office.

No matter the arguments for the service, there just weren't enough users, and the world remained unchanged. Combine the lack of profits, the lack of adoption, and the privacy concerns, and Google Health was doomed.

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